Smart sticker could hit the cricket world for six

Spektacom Technologies has introduced an AI-led smart sticker, which could enable cricket stars to enhance and maximise their batting technique through data analysis.

The company is a startup founded by cricketer Anil Kumble - image courtesy of Depositphotos.
The company is a startup founded by cricketer Anil Kumble – image courtesy of Depositphotos.

The startup was founded by former Indian cricket captain Anil Kumble, and is supported by Microsoft and broadcast partner, Star India.

Based on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform which uses AI and IoT technology, the Power Bat enables sports stars the ability to take their game to the next level.

The Power Bat’s shoulder – the upper part of the bat’s face – has the lightweight, Azure Sphere-powered sticker fixed to it.

As soon as the player strikes the ball with the bat, data on different parameters; speed on impact, twist on impact, power and quality of the shot are recorded. Players can then use the Spektacom App to view their own scores in real-time and work towards improving batting techniques.

The sticker itself has similar dimensions to a credit card and weighs less than five grams, it can stick to any regular sized cricket bat and can be charged wirelessly using compatible wireless chargers.

Although the technology has its first use case in cricket, this is the first of many sports where it could potentially be used.

Key advantages:

  • Players: Use the Spektacom App to analyse, compare and improve performance
  • Coaches: Real-time modeling of shot behavior helps provide more meaningful insights to sports stars performance
  • Broadcasters: Re-imagined fan engagement experience with all new parameters to measure batting quality
  • Spectators: Understand the science of batting, follow favorite players and watch them grow

Case study: SciSports

Traditionally, football data generated is collected only on players who have the ball - image courtesy of Depositphotos.
Traditionally, football data generated is collected only on players who have the ball – image courtesy of Depositphotos.

This is not the first example of IoT propelling sport forward.

The Manufacturer previously reported that Dutch startup, SciSports, is able to take real-time data and apply machine learning and artificial intelligence in order to capture and analyse information.

Traditionally, football data generated is collected only on players who have the ball, leaving everything else undocumented.

Subsequently, SciSports developed a real-time tracking camera system, BallJames.

BallJames automatically generates 3D data from video, with 14 cameras placed around the football stadium recording every movement on the field. BallJames then generates data such as the precision, direction and speed of passing, sprinting strength and jumping height.