Workforce and skills: High flying drop out

MTA and AMRC have launched a new apprenticeship which responds to real business trends in manufacturing and the evolving job description of the modern engineer.

The job description of the average engineer has changed a lot in recent years. Now MTA and AMRC have launched a new apprenticeship which recognises the evolution.

Some in industry complain that apprenticeship training, as delivered by many colleges, is too often a relic of a by-gone age, focusing on craft skills delivered on outdated equipment.

Step in The Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre and the Manufacturing Technologies Association. Both are intimate with the very latest, and indeed future, developments in machine tools and automation and both have taken care to listen closely to the business needs of their members – particularly with regards to skills. It’s a recipe of expertise, knowledge and facilities – AMRC is ‘tooled-up’ to the teeth with top of the range and sometimes unique manufacturing technologies – which has allowed the two organisations to launch a new apprenticeship pathway. A pathway fit to develop leading engineers with commercial capability – ready to compete in globalised markets.

MTA Member response to the Commercial Engineering Apprenticeship

“The New MTA Commercial Apprenticeships, developed with the AMRC, is a great initiative for the industry and helps address the skills gap in training available. Having attended the launch event, I spoke with a number of other MTA members who will be putting individuals forward for this apprenticeship” – Simon Pollard, Managing Director, Kyal Machine Tools Ltd

Graham Dewhurst, director-general of the MTA, which represents several hundred precision engineering and technology companies in Britain, said: “There is a member need in our association for more suitable, modern skills. We need high trained salespeople, because now manufacturing is about customer solutions.”It’s a recipe of expertise, knowledge and facilities – AMRC is ‘tooled-up’ to the teeth with top of the range and sometimes unique manufacturing technologies – which has allowed the two organisations to launch a new apprenticeship pathway. A pathway fit to develop leading engineers with commercial capability – ready to compete in globalised markets.

Alison Bettac, director of training at AMRC, agrees and explained that this is why CPD and leadership are essential parts of the new Commercial Engineering Framework. “These [streams] were developed with companies such as GlaxoSmithKline and Rolls-Royce in mind. There is a technical need for leadership in industry as an integral part of professional training,” she added.

The apprenticeship was launched at AMRC, where its off-the-job elements will be delivered, on February 8. Initial responses from industry have been very positive about the framework, applauding its strong technical foundations, supplemented by commercial focus and language skills.