Jacobs wins $400m Nasa White Sands Test Facility contract

Posted on 14 Apr 2016 by Tim Brown
Steve Lighthill, of Nasa, carefully smoothes out a Nasa logo decal after affixing it to the Orion test module flown at tests held at the Nasa White Sands Test Facility - image courtesy of Nasa

Jacobs Engineering Group has been awarded the Test Evaluation and Support Team 2 (TEST2) contract at NASA’s White Sands Test Facility near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

The contract, effective May 1, has a maximum value of $400m with a two-year base period of performance and three one-year options.

Under the terms of the contract, Jacobs is expected to provide support to all current and future NASA programs for space transportation and human space flight, as well as other Federal agencies and commercial customers. This includes services in the areas of propulsion system testing; materials and components testing; hypervelocity impact testing; critical flight hardware processing and refurbishment; composite pressure systems testing and analysis; operation and maintenance of on-site laboratories and facilities; and emergency services.

In making the announcement, Jacobs senior vice president aerospace and technology, Ward Johnson, said: “Jacobs is proud to support Nasa’s [White Sands Test Facility] critical mission sustaining and advancing human space flight capabilities. We look forward to applying innovative and agile technical and management approaches across all elements of the TEST2 scope while ensuring a strong focus on safety.”

Jacobs is one of the world’s largest and most diverse providers of technical, professional and construction services. Its Aerospace and Technology line of business provides technical and innovative enterprise solutions to government and commercial clients.

The Nasa White Sands Test Facility is a US government rocket engine test facility and a component of Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. It is a self-contained facility with medical, fire and hazardous rescue personnel and is used for testing and evaluating potentially hazardous materials, space flight components, and rocket propulsion systems.